Waste-to-Energy New Investment Review

In April 2021, AcuComm added five new waste-to-energy (WtE) projects with a cumulative value of US$512 million to its WasteView Contract Finder database. These projects, located in Australia, India, Nigeria and Norway, are due to start operating in 2025 or later when they will bring 113 MW of new energy capacity online. Total waste throughput for these five projects will be 2.2 million tonnes per annum.

Value of New Projects by Operational Status US$mn (April 2021)

NIR WtE2 April 21

Over the 12-month period (May 2020 to April 2021),  AcuComm covered a total of 94 new WtE projects, valued at US$23.6 billion. Over the 12-month period, investment in the new projects covered was largely concentrated in Russia, China, Japan, Poland and the UK.

Top 5 Countries by Investment Value in US$mn (May 2020 to April 2021)

NIR WtE April 21

Each month, AcuComm presents this headline data in its Waste-to-Energy New Investment Review, one of a series of five complimentary reports which provide a strategic snapshot of the very latest activity in a specific area of the global waste and bioenergy markets.

The New Investment Review series includes:

  • Waste-to-Energy
  • Plastic Recycling
  • Waste Processing
  • Landfill
  • AD/Biogas.

If the New Investment Review series is of interest, but feel that you need to delve deeper in order to develop your commercial strategy and marketing plans, you may wish to consider AcuComm’s Waste Market Insightsa monthly service that presents a wealth of comprehensive information including industry forecasts, historical data and insights which can be used to identify key trends across technologies, feedstocks and geographies, measured by outputs, values, capacities, volumes etc.

All the data in Waste Market Insights and the New Investment Review series derives from AcuComm’s WasteView Contract Finder, its  proprietary database of 8,500+ waste and bioenergy projects around the world.

If you would like to find out more, please contact either:

Rob / 44 (0)7399 863 765 / [email protected], or

Oliwia / 44 (0)7399 863 806 / [email protected]

New Investment Review: Waste Processing

In March 2021, AcuComm added seven new waste processing projects with a cumulative value of US$96 million to its WasteView Contract Finder database. These facilities, located in Brazil, , Ecuador, Germany, Spain and the United States, will process over 900,000 tonnes of waste per annum. Over the 12-month period (April 2020 to March 2021),  AcuComm covered a total of 116 new waste processing projects, valued at over US$3.1 billion.

Top 5 Countries by Investment in Waste Processing Facilities,
Reported April 2020-March 2021 (US$mn)

NIR Waste Processing March 21

In terms of waste type, coverage was predominantly MSW over the 12-month period, accounting for 75% of the total processing capacity – ahead of industrial waste on 6%.

Project Tonnage by Waste Type,
Reported April 2020-March 2021 (%)

NIR PIE Waste Processing March 21

Each month, AcuComm presents this headline data in its Waste-to-Energy New Investment Review, one of a series of five complimentary reports which provide a strategic snapshot of the very latest activity in a specific area of the global waste and bioenergy markets.

The New Investment Review series includes:

  • Waste-to-Energy
  • Plastic Recycling
  • Waste Processing
  • Landfill
  • AD/Biogas.

If the New Investment Review series is of interest, but feel that you need to delve deeper in order to develop your commercial strategy and marketing plans, you may wish to consider AcuComm’s Waste Market Insightsa monthly service that presents a wealth of comprehensive information including industry forecasts, historical data and insights which can be used to identify key trends across technologies, feedstocks and geographies, measured by outputs, values, capacities, volumes etc.

All the data in Waste Market Insights and the New Investment Review series derives from AcuComm’s WasteView Contract Finder, its  proprietary database of 8,500+ waste and bioenergy projects around the world.

If you would like to find out more, please contact either:

Rob / 44 (0)7399 863 765 / [email protected], or

Oliwia / 44 (0)7399 863 806 / [email protected]

Municipal Waste Disposal Services in Greater Manchester: dealing with COVID-19

Greater Manchester, with a population of around 2.8 million, is one of the UK’s single largest areas for waste disposal. In 1986, the Greater Manchester Waste Disposal Authority (GMWDA) was created, covering most of Greater Manchester[1]. In 2018, the activities of the GMWDA were made part of the more general Greater Manchester Combined Authority (GMCA). The leading provider of waste services for the GMCA is now Suez International, which has replaced Viridor. The company signed an initial seven-year contract with the GMCA in May 2019[2].

The Greater Manchester area generates around 1.1 million tonnes of waste each year. This figure has not changed much over the past five years. In 2018/19, around 47% was recycled or composted, up a little from 43% in 2014/15. The biggest change has been regarding landfill. In 2014/15, Greater Manchester sent 30% of waste to landfill, equal to 331,861 tonnes. By 2018/19, this had fallen to 8%, or 85,643 tonnes. Much of this now goes to WtE incineration. This accounted for 44% of waste disposal in 2018/19 (496,692 tonnes), compared with 25% (269,861 tonnes) in 2014/15.

Andy - Manchester 2
Source: DEFRA

Waste Facilities

There are now no active landfills in the area. The GMCA continues to maintain four closed sites, but the majority of old sites were sold off for redevelopment in 2012[3]. As noted above, landfill tonnage has reduced considerably, and what remains is presumably freighted outside the area for disposal.

Residual waste is first taken to one of five Mechanical Treatment and Reception facilities. These are located in Oldham, Salford, Sharston and Stockport, as well as Manchester itself[4]. These sort waste and create RDF, which is taken to the Runcorn facility (see below).

Greater Manchester maintains one WtE incineration facility, at Raikes Lane in Bolton. This is an old facility, first built in 1971 and modernised in 2000. It generates up to 11 MW of electricity and has annual capacity of around 100,000 tonnes[5].

This is only around 20% of the total WtE registered for Greater Manchester. The bulk of the rest is sent to the Runcorn Energy From Waste Plant. This is in Cheshire, outside Greater Manchester. The site is managed by Viridor and opened in two stages in 2015. It can treat around 850,000 tonnes of waste annually, and generates a maximum of 80 MW of electrical power.

Finally, the GMCA maintains a Materials Recovery Facility, located at Longley Lane in Manchester. This can handle 90,000 tonnes of pre-separated recycling waste per year, and sorts glass, metals and plastics.

Andy - Manchester 1
Source: GCMA/AcuComm database

COVID-19: Lockdown challenges

The effects of the COVID-19 lockdown have been affected in two principal ways, as SUEZ seeks to implement the necessary social distancing rules. Firstly there are fewer household waste collections. Domestic waste collection across Manchester typically entails one general waste collection per week, plus fortnightly collections for paper, metal/glass/plastic, and garden/food waste. Under the COVID-19 restrictions, the weekly general collection remains, but recycling collections are now only monthly, and weekly garden/food waste collections have stopped altogether.

Secondly, as of March 23rd, all 20 public recycling centres across Greater Manchester have been closed, until further notice. Individuals and tradesmen are no longer able to take garden waste or bulky items to be disposed of.

It is far too early for statistics to appear, but there are sure to have been major changes in the composition of waste. With more people at home more of the time, the volume of domestic waste can be expected to rise, counterbalanced by a major, and probably far greater, fall in waste from businesses, shops and restaurants. Within the domestic sphere, recycling levels are likely to fall, as people put more of their recyclables into their regular bin, instead of the recycling bin (fewer collections) or taking things to the recycling centre (closed). While the overall level of waste generation is probably falling during the lockdown, dealing with these changing geographic and waste-mix patterns is a challenge for waste companies and managers.

There are other knock-on environmental effects too. The ban on food waste collections had to be briefly lifted, as councils realised that indefinitely leaving rotting food in people’s bins is a potential public health hazard. Noticeably more people have been having bonfires in their gardens, seemingly to get rid of garden waste that is not now being collected. We can probably expect a rise in fly-tipping, as people have no easy means of disposing of bulky or difficult-to-dispose-of items. As I write, there is some vague talk of a partial reopening of recycling centres, probably for those very reasons. Finally, more people are doing their grocery shopping online, and this is leading to a resurgence in single-use plastic bags, as these are the best way to deliver shopping in the days of social distancing. I am sure there will be other, as yet unforeseen, consequences.

These sorts of restrictions and challenges are of course not unique to Manchester; they apply to urban areas across the UK and indeed the developed world. When economies come out of this emergency, many things are going to look very different, and the waste sector cannot expect to remain unaffected.

[1] The town of Wigan is the only part of Greater Manchester to continue to manage its waste disposal separately.

[2] Suez press release https://www.suez.com/en/news/press-releases/suez-supports-the-greater-manchester-in-its-waster-management-services-for-an-amount-of-over-one-billion-sterling

[3] GMCA https://zerowastegm.co.uk/energy-and-waste-management/landfill-aftercare-2/

[4] GMCA https://zerowastegm.co.uk/energy-and-waste-management/mechanical-biological-treatment-facilities/

[5] https://recycleforgreatermanchester.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/TRF-Case-Study-R4GM-Higher-level-fact-sheets-August-2014_Layout-1-2.pdf

Andy Crofts: Chief Analyst, AcuComm

Waste Management Inc. to consolidate industry leadership.

North America’s leading provider of comprehensive waste management environmental services, Waste Management Inc., has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Florida-based Advanced Disposal Services, the fourth largest solid waste company in the United States, in a deal valued at US$4.9 billion.

With 2018 revenues of US$1.56 billion, adjusted EBITDA of US$427 million and approximately 6,000 employees, Advanced Disposal serves more than 3 million residential, commercial, and industrial customers, including over 800 municipalities primarily in 16 states in the Eastern half of the United States. Advanced Disposal’s solid waste network includes 94 collection operations, 73 transfer stations, 41 landfills, and 22 owned or operated recycling facilities.

Waste Management owns or operates 252 landfill sites, the largest network of landfills in North America with a total capacity of 5.0 billion tons. It also manages 314 waste transfer stations, operates 130 landfill gas-to-energy facilities and is a leading recycler of paper, cardboard, glass, plastic and metal, with 102 material recycling facilities (MRFs). As of the end of December 2018, the company had 43,700 full-time employees.

With Waste Management’s position within the US waste industry set to become more dominant through the acquisition, it remains to be seen if the US regulators will require divestments for competition-related reasons. With this possibility in mind, an opt-out clause to abandon the deal has been adopted which will trigger if the enforced divestments exceed US$200 million.

AcuComm’s Daily Full Access Project – Spain MBT

Construction of a mechanical biological treatment plant

Last month, it was announced that Sacyr Environment and Romero Polo are planning to build and operate a municipal waste treatment centre in Segrià, Montoliu de Lleida, for a total amount of €76.1 million.

The contract, awarded by the waste consortium Consorci de Residus del Segrià to Sacyr Environment and Romero Polo, includes the initial construction of a new MBT facility; as well as the expansion of an existing composting plant and landfill. Also included in the contract is a 10 year agreement for the management and operation of the new facility.

The contract, which has been in place since July 2018, includes the construction of the plant; which is expected to take 24 months. The remaining eight years of the contract will be dedicated to the operation of the plant.

Overall, the MBT plant will treat more than 60,000 tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 15,000 tonnes of organic matter. This treatment will take place in a trench composting membrane; this technology is highly flexible, durable and sustainable, and will help minimise the carbon footprint, while reducing the emission of odours, resulting in high-quality compost.

Find out more about this project.